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Play the "Sound Subtraction" Game

Welcome back to Read Not Guess. Today is a review day. We’ll give you a game to try with your kids and then practice blending some words using the sounds we’ve learned so far.


Let’s start with a word game.


Sound Subtraction


This is a speaking game. You’re going to divide words into their sound parts, and then ask your child to name the new (short) word.


It’s important for kids to hear how words change when you add, subtract, or change sounds. It helps them hear the individual sounds in words and understand that different sound combinations convey different meanings.


Read your child the questions and see if they can come up with the answers:


Question: What word do you get when you remove “back” from “backpack?”

Answer: pack


Question: What word do you get when you remove “soft” from “softball?”

Answer: ball


Question: What word do you get when you remove “sun” from “sunscreen?”

Answer: screen


Question: What word do you get when you remove “green” from “greenhouse?”

Answer: house

Now try some where you remove the last syllable:

Question: What word do you get when you remove “boy” from “cowboy?”

Answer: cow

Question: What word do you get when you remove “brush” from “toothbrush?”

Answer: tooth

Question: What word do you get when you remove “night” from “goodnight?”

Answer: good

And finish with a couple harder ones:

Question: What word do you get when you remove “er” from the word “teacher?”

Answer: teach

Question: What word do you get when you remove “er” from the word “banker?”

Answer: bank

Question: What word do you get when you remove “less” from the word “breathless?”

Answer: breath

Question: What word do you get when you remove “less” from the word “careless?”

Answer: care

If your child struggled with any of these, go back and have them do it again. Repeated practice is good for kids.


For a harder challenge, swap roles. Have your child give you a word to guess based on subtracting sounds. Made-up words are fine! What's important here is for your child to hear the individual sounds and practice combining them together.


(Note that this is a game you can play anywhere. Try it at the dinner table, in the car, or anytime you’re waiting around.)


Word Practice


Now we’re going to work on blending the "th" sound that we learned earlier this week. Your child can start slowly by saying each sound individually, but each time, they should try to say it just a bit faster.


Let’s start with this one:


p a th

p ath

path

Did they get it right? If they're still reading it as "puh-ah -thuh" by the end of the sequence, have them do it faster until they are reading the word "path" correctly. Let’s do some more:

sl o th

sl oth

sloth

And:

cl o th

cl oth

cloth

Now a few harder ones:

th r a sh

th rash

thrash

And:

th r ow

th row

throw

And:


th e f t

th ef t

theft

Hard Word Challenge


If you think your child is ready, see if they can read this word:

Thunder

How did they do? We haven’t worked on the “er” ending yet, but were they able to sound it out? If they stumble, have them read it another time or two to get it right.


That’s it for today. We’ll see you next time,

~Chad

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